Certification: GCIH

Certification:

GIAC Certified Incident Handler (GCIH)

Description

Incident handlers manage security incidents by understanding common attack techniques, vectors and tools as well as defending against and/or responding to such attacks when they occur. The GCIH certification focuses on detecting, responding, and resolving computer security incidents and covers the following security techniques:

  • The steps of the incident handling process
  • Detecting malicious applications and network activity
  • Common attack techniques that compromise hosts
  • Detecting and analyzing system and network vulnerabilities
  • Continuous process improvement by discovering the root causes of incidents

*No Specific training is required for any GIAC certification. There are many sources of information available regarding the certification objectives' knowledge areas. Practical experience is an option; there are also numerous books on the market covering Computer Information Security. Another option is any relevant courses from training providers, including SANS.*

Requirements

  • 1 proctored exam
  • 150 questions
  • Time limit of 4 hours
  • For all GCIH exam attempts activated on or after August 2nd, 2012, the Minimum Passing Score is 72%

Note:

About the GCIH Exam: All GIAC exams are delivered online and must be proctored through GIAC's exam partner, Pearson VUE. Click here to schedule an exam.

  • There are 150 questions on the exam and a time limit of four hours.
  • Based on a scientific study, passing point for the GCIH exam is 72%
  • Exams purchased with SANS training will be available 7-10 days following the end of the conference.
  • GCIH Challenge exams are available to potential candidates that are experienced Incident Handlers.
  • The GCIH Exam may be scheduled anytime within a 120 day window once a candidate has paid for the examination attempt
  • To verify the details of your certification attempt, read the Certification Information found in your portal account at https://exams.giac.org/pages/attempts.

Renew

Certifications must be renewed every 4 years. Click here for details.

Delivery

NOTE: All GIAC exams are delivered through proctored test centers and must be scheduled in advance.
GIAC certification attempts will be activated in your GIAC account after your application has been approved and according to the terms of your purchase. Details on delivery will be provided along with your registration confirmation upon payment. You will receive an email notification when your certification attempt has been activated in your account. You will have 120 days from the date of activation to complete your certification attempt. GIAC exams must be proctored through Pearson VUE. Please click the following link for instructions on How to Schedule Your GIAC Proctored Exam http://www.giac.org/information/schedule_proctored_exam.pdf. GIAC exams are delivered online through a standard web browser.

Links


Bulletin (Part 2 of Candidate Handbook)

Exam Certification Objectives & Outcome Statements

The topic areas for each exam part follow:

Backdoors & Trojan Horses
The candidate will demonstrate a detailed understanding of how Backdoors are used to gain access to systems, and how to defend systems.
Buffer Overflows
The candidate will demonstrate an understanding of what a buffer overflow is, how they are created, and how to defend against them. Additionally, candidates will demonstrate a high-level understanding of how attackers use common tools to create and maintain a backdoor on a compromised system.
Covering Tracks: Networks
The candidate will demonstrate an understanding of how attackers use tunneling and covert channels to cover their tracks on a network, and the strategies involved in defending against them.
Covering Tracks: Systems
The candidate will demonstrate an understanding of how attackers hide files and directories on Windows and Linux hosts and how they attempt to cover their tracks.
Denial of Service Attacks
The candidate will demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of the different kinds of Denial of Service attacks and how to defend against them.
Exploiting Systems using Netcat
The candidate will demonstrate an understanding of how to properly use the Netcat utility and how to defend against it.
Format String Attacks
The candidate will demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of how format string attacks work and how to defend against them.
Incident Handling Overview and Preparation
The candidate will demonstrate an understanding of what Incident Handling is, why it is important, and an understanding of best practices to take in preparation for an Incident.
Incident Handling Phase 2 Identification
The candidate will demonstrate an understanding of important strategies to gather events, analyze them, and determine if we have an incident.
Incident Handling Phase 3 Containment
The candidate will demonstrate an understanding of high-level strategies to prevent an attacker from causing further damage to the victim after discovering the incident.
Incident Handling: Recovering and Improving Capabilities
The candidate will demonstrate an understanding of the general approaches to get rid of the attacker's artifacts on compromised machines, the general strategy to safely restore operations, and the importance of the incident report and "lessons learned" meetings.
IP Address Spoofing
The candidate will demonstrate an understanding of what IP Spoofing is, the three different types of spoofing, and strategies to defend against it.
Network Sniffing
The candidate will know what network sniffing is, how to use common sniffing tools, and how to defend against sniffers.
Password Attacks
The candidate will demonstrate a detailed understanding of the three methods of password cracking.
Reconnaissance
The candidate will demonstrate an understanding of public and open source reconnaissance techniques.
Rootkits
The candidate will demonstrate an understanding of how user-mode and kernel-mode rootkits operate, what their capabilities are and how to defend against them.
Scanning: Host Discovery
The candidate will demonstrate an understanding of the tools and techniques used for host discovery on wired and wireless networks.
Scanning: Network and Application Vulnerability scanning and tools
The candidate will demonstrate an understanding of the fundamentals of network and application vulnerability scanners, common commercial and open source tools, and how to defend against them.
Scanning: Network Devices (Firewall rules determination, fragmentation, and IDS/IPS evasion)
The candidate will demonstrate an understanding of how to use Firewalk to determine firewall policies, the general principles of IP fragmentation attacks, why they are used, as well as the ability to identify them.
Scanning: Service Discovery
The candidate will demonstrate an understanding of the tools and techniques used for network mapping, port scanning, and passive fingerprinting techniques and how to defend against them.
Session Hijacking, Tools and Defenses
The candidate will demonstrate an understanding of the definition of session hijacking, the two methods commonly used and why it is effective. Additionally, the candidate will demonstrate an understanding of how to identify common hijacking tools and the strategies to prepare for, identify and contain hijacking attacks.
Types of Incidents
The candidate will demonstrate an understanding of multiple types of incidents, including espionage, unauthorized use, intellectual property, and insider threats and apply strategies to prevent or address these cases.
Virtual Machine Attacks
The candidate will demonstrate an understanding of the virtual machine environment from an attackers perspective, including targets and detection, and how to defend against threats.
Web Application Attacks
The candidate will demonstrate an understanding of the value of the Open Web Application Security Project (OWASP), as well as different Web App attacks such as account harvesting, SQL injection, Cross-Site Scripting and other Web Session attacks.
Worms, Bots & Bot-Nets
The candidate will demonstrate a detailed understanding of what worms, bots and bot-nets are, and how to protect against them.

Where to Get Help

Training is available from a variety of resources including on line, course attendance at a live conference, and self study.

Practical experience is another way to ensure that you have mastered the skills necessary for certification. Many professionals have the experience to meet the certification objectives identified.

Finally, college level courses or study through another program may meet the needs for mastery.

The procedure to contest exam results can be found at http://www.giac.org/about/procedures/grievance.